Hacked - Mr. Duncan R MacMaster

"You're a very different kind of man Jake Mooney," she said. "It's almost like you belong here, but don't belong here."

 

"How is that?"

 

"Your life is like a movie," she said, "and I think the last thing you want is to live your life like that." ...

 

"This is my second go-round for this sort of thing," I said, "and the problem with sequels is that they always have to top the one that went before them."


I remember really enjoying Hack, our introduction to Jake Mooney. But, I didn't remember exactly why I did (I guess I could've read my post about it, but that sounds too much like research). It took almost no time at all to remember once I dipped into this Hacked (and many of the details about Hack came back to me straight away, too). Hack had a strong voice, fun characters, a clever mystery, with a satisfying conclusion to wrap things up. Hacked gives us more of all that.

 

For those of you who haven't met Jake Moody, he's a former journalist turned ghostwriter. Two years before this novel, he rose to fame by solving multiple homicides. He then finished ghostwriting the autobiography of one of the murder victims. He then writes his own account of what transpired (see Hack for details), as well as a fantasy novel. Now he's been talked into coming to LA to sell the movie rights to any/all of his books.

 

Before his days of ghostwriting, Jake lived in LA and still has plenty of friends there and touches base with a couple of them. One of the things everyone is talking about there is the hacking of a movie company and the release of private date from them—supposedly, this is a North Korean retaliation for the portrayal of Kim Jong Un in one of that studio's movies. A legendary agent who Jake knew years ago inadvertently puts Jake in the middle of the investigation. Not long after that, a P.I. friend of his asks him to consult on the same topic.

 

When Jake arrives at his friend's home, however, he finds his friend brutally murdered. The assumption has to be that the people behind the hack are the people who killed his friend. So while he really is content to leave the investigation into the hack to the proper authorities, seeing his friend's body sets Jake inexorably into finding out who committed the murder (and the hack while he's at it).

 

Jake's assisted in this hunt by his agent friend, his new agent, an accountant turned security guard, a former FBI agent, a ride-share driver who's always wanted to be up to escapades like this, and an attractive studio exec. Help comes from other directions, too, but I'm not going to ruin the surprise for you.

 

It's not long before someone tries to kill Jake, he's kidnapped more than once, assaulted, and . . . you know what? You wouldn't believe me if I listed all that happens to this poor writer (also, why ruin the surprise?)—I couldn't help imagining MacMaster asking himself, "What else can I do to Jake? A tiger attack? Nah, not sure how to get him in the cage, but I do know how to ...."

 

The LAPD is eager to pin all of the death and destruction on Jake, but the more they press him, the more adamant he becomes that he won't leave. Given the strong cloud of suspicion that North Korea is behind the hack, and presumably the murder of his friend, the FBI is involved, too. They're less inclined to suspect Jake of having anything to do with the murder, but they'd like him away from the case.

 

There are more than the requisite number of twists and turns to this case, none of them feels forced or gratuitous. And even when you're faster at putting the pieces together than Jake is, you should probably take a beat before criticizing him, because you're probably not as right as you think you are.

 

The tone is what separates this from similar mysteries. This is not a comedy —there's a brutal murder, including signs of torture to start things off. There are threats of violence, actual violence, and more deaths to come. But the way that MacMaster tells it makes it become one of the funniest and most enjoyable reads of the year. Think Marshall Karp's Lomax and Biggs Mysteries for tone. That's probably not the most helpful comparison, come to think of it, because I'm not sure how many people are familiar with them (too few for sure). Okay, think of this as a Shane Black story—just a novel instead of a script, and there's no tie to Christmas. MacMaster's Kirby Baxter books are more overtly comical than his Jake Mooney books, but both are just flat-out entertaining and laugh-filled.

 

Typically, in books/TV/movies, Hollywood Agents are not depicted sympathetically. Which is probably a bit of an understatement, really. But Jake's old friend and new agent are both depicted as decent people that he can rely on. That's not really a plus or a minus when it comes to evaluating, but it's so strange that I felt compelled to mention it. I can't remember another fictional Agent who wasn't some sort of duplicitous, manipulative, weasel.

 

The story, Jake and the other characters, the fun had a Hollywood's expense, the twists, etc. would've been good enough to make me rave. But there's a Chinese gentleman that plays a big role in the novel—I don't want to say much about him, because you just have to meet him yourself. He pops up repeatedly throughout the novel, yet we really don't spend that much time with him altogether. But he steals every scene he's in. He's one of my favorite new characters of 2019. If there's a Hacked Again or Hack Harder or whatever, I hope MacMaster can come up with an excuse to use him again.

 

I just had so much fun with this one (a common theme when it comes to MacMaster)—I can't think of a single reason why someone shouldn't read this (you don't have to read Hack first, by the way). Jake was right in what he said before, the problem with sequels is that they have to top the one that went before. Hacked easily does that. It's smartly-written, cleverly-plotted and just fun to read. Go run and grab it!

LetsReadIndie Reading Challenge2019 Cloak & Dagger Challenge

Source: http://irresponsiblereader.com/2019/12/16/duncan-macmaster-a-smart-fun-sequel-that-topped-the-one-that-went-before