In one of the lightest moments of Robert B. Parker's Valediction (just before one of the darker), Spenser describes his reservation about the first two Star Wars movies: "No horses . . . I don't like a movie without horses." After watching Return of the Jedi, he comments that it was a silly movie, but "Horses would have saved it." Which makes me wonder what he'd have thought about The Last Jedi. Horses aren't my thing, it's dogs. I'm not quite as bad as Spenser is about them -- I like books without dogs. But occasionally a good dog would save a book for me -- or make a good book even better. I got to thinking about this a few weeks back when I realized just how many books I'd read last year that featured great dogs -- and then I counted those books and couldn't believe it. I tried to stick to 10 (because that's de rigueur), but I failed. I also tried to leave it with books that I read for the first time in 2018 -- but I couldn't cut two of my re-reads.

 

So, here are my favorite dogs from 2018 -- they added something to their novels that made me like them more, usually they played big roles in the books (but not always).

 

(in alphabetical order by author)

 

  • Edgar from The Puppet Show by M. W. Craven (my post about the book) -- Edgar has a pretty small role in the book, really. But there's something about him that made me like Washington Poe a little more -- and he made Tilly Bradshaw pretty happy, and that makes Edgar a winner in my book.

 

  • Kenji from Smoke Eaters by Sean Grigsby (my post about the book) -- The moment that Grigsby introduced Kenji to the novel, it locked in my appreciation for it. I'm not sure I can explain it, but the added detail of robot dogs -- at once a trivial notion, and yet it says so much about the culture Cole Brannigan lives in. Also, he was a pretty fun dog.

 

  • Rutherford from The TV Detective by Simon Hall (my post about the book) -- Dan Groves' German Shepherd is a great character. He provides Dan with companionship, a sounding board, a reason to leave the house -- a way to bond with the ladies. Dan just felt more like a real person with Rutherford in his life. Yeah, he's never integral to the plot (at least in the first two books of the series), but the books wouldn't work quite as well without him.

 

  • Oberon from Scourged by Kevin Hearne (my post about the book) -- Everyone's favorite Irish Wolfhound doesn't get to do much in this book, because Atticus is so focused on keeping him safe (as he should be). But when he's "on screen," he makes it count. He brings almost all of the laughs and has one of the best ideas in the novel.

 

  • Mouse from Brief Cases by Jim Butcher (my post about the book) -- From the moment we read, "My name is Mouse and I am a Good Dog. Everyone says so," a good novella becomes a great one. As the series has progressed, Mouse consistently (and increasingly) steals scenes from his friend, Harry Dresden, and anyone else who might be around. But here where we get a story (in part) from his perspective, Mouse takes the scene stealing to a whole new level. He's brave, he's wise, he's scary, he's loyal -- he's a very good dog.

 

  • Ruffin from Wrecked by Joe Ide (my post about the book) -- Without Isaiah Quintabe's dog opening up conversation between IQ and Grace, most of this book wouldn't have happened -- so it's good for Grace's sake that Ruffin was around. And that case is made even more from the way that Ruffin is a support for Grace. He also is a fantastic guard dog and saves lives. His presence is a great addition to this book.

 

  • Dog from An Obvious Fact by Craig Johnson (my post about the book) -- I might have been able to talk myself into ignoring re-reads if I hadn't listened to this audiobook (or any of the series, come to think of it) last year -- or if Dog had been around in last year's novel. Dog's a looming presence, sometimes comic relief (or at least a mood-lightener), sometimes a force of nature. Dog probably gets to do more for Walt in this book -- he helps Walt capture some, he attacks others, just being around acts as a deterrent for many who'd want to make things rough on Walt. Walt couldn't ask for a better partner.

 

  • Trogdor from The Frame-Up by Meghan Scott Molin (my post about the book) -- Honestly, Trogdor probably has the least impact on the book than any of the dogs on this list. But, come on, a Corgi names Trodgor? The idea is cute enough to justify inclusion here. He's a good pet, a fitting companion for MG -- not unlike Dan's Rutherford. He just adds a little something to the mix that helps ground and flesh-out his human companion.

 

  • Mingus from The Drifter by Nicholas Petrie (my post about the book) -- Like Trogdor, a great name. Like Mouse and Dog, a great weapon. He's really a combination of the two of them (just lacking Mouse's magical nature). He's vital in many different ways to the plot and the safety of those we readers care about. Petrie made a good move when he added this beast of a dog to the novel.

 

  • Chet from Dog On It by Spencer Quinn (my posts about Chet) -- If I couldn't cut Dog, I couldn't cut Chet. Listening to this audiobook (my 4th or 5th time through the novel, I believe) reminded me how much I love and miss Chet -- and how eager I am for his return this year. This Police Academy reject is almost as good a detective as his partner, Bernie, is. Chet will make you laugh, he'll warm your heart, he'll make you want a dog of your own (actually, all of these dogs will)

 

  • Zoey from Deck the Hounds by David Rosenfelt (my post about the book) -- how do I not invoke Tara when discussing an Andy Carpenter book? Good question. It's Zoey that brings Andy into the story, it's Zoey that helps Don to cope with his own issues, it's Zoey that defends Don and saves him (in many ways). Sure, Tara's the best dog in New Jersey, but Zoey comes close to challenging her status in this book.

 

  • Lopside from Voyage of the Dogs by Greg van Eekhout (my post about the book) -- It almost feels like cheating to bring in a dog from a novel about dogs -- conversely, it's hard to limit it to just one dog from this book. But Lopside the Barkonaut would demand a place here if he was the only dog among a bunch of humans -- or if he was surrounded by more dogs. He's brave, he's self-sacrificing, he's a hero. He'll charm you and get you to rooting for these abandoned canines in record time.

 

Source: http://irresponsiblereader.com/2019/01/03/my-favorite-2018-fictional-dogs