My Sister, the Serial Killer - Oyinkan Braithwaite

Ayoola summons me with these words -- Korede, I killed him.

 

I had hoped I would never hear those words again.

 

That's one of the best pair of opening sentences I can recall. How do you not get hooked right there? You get so much in those two sentences, you know that Ayoola has killed multiple times, at least three (otherwise, Korede would've said something like "What, again?"); the fact that she says "him," instead of "someone" or a name suggests that Korede will know who she's talking about without explanation; and you hear a put upon sibling fed up with their sister's antics.

 

And yeah, that's the book in essence -- Ayoola has killed her third boyfriend (in self-defense, she swears . . . again), and calls on her big sister to come help clean up. Korede's a clean freak -- she's not quite OCD, but close. When life gets stressful, she cleans, and with her little sister, she's got plenty of stress in her life.

 

Korede is beginning to think that Ayoola might not just be the innocent girl who has been able narrowly escape assault. Three kills, she's read online, qualifies you to be a serial killer. And what's worse -- the doctor that Korede has unrequited feelings for has caught her sister's eye, too (and vice versa) -- and that can't be good for him. I had about a dozen ideas how this was going to end -- and I was wrong on every point. Which is good, because Braithwaite's ideas were far better than mine would've been. She zagged when most would've zigged and nailed the resolution to this book.

 

This is enough to make an entertaining and suspense filled book. But then you throw in the characters that Braithwaite has created and things take on a different twist.

Korede's a nurse -- a demanding, dedicated, compassionate one. Ayoola is a vapid knockout who knows that it doesn't matter what she knows, does, or thinks -- she's convinced that all she has to do is continue to look good and make men feel good about themselves and she's set. This seems shallow, but neither Ayoola or Korede can prove that she's wrong.

 

The dynamic of the long-suffering, responsible, plain(er) sibling doing the right thing and looking out for the spontaneous, outgoing, super attractive one isn't new. Adding a mother who takes the responsible one for granted and dotes on the other, doesn't change things, either. But somehow, Braithwaite is able to depict these three in a way that seems wholly familiar (so you can make assumptions about a lot of the relationship) and yet it feels so fresh she might have invented the archetypes.

 

If Jennifer Weiner lived in and wrote about Lagos, Nigeria and included murders in a tale of sibling rivalry and learning to accept yourself -- you'd get something a lot like this book. There's an intangible, ineffable quality to Braithwaite's writing that I cannot capture better than that -- but it's better than my illustration sounds. The story goes to some really dark places, and there's really no reason to find the characters or story so charming -- but that's all down to Braithwaite's fantastic authorial voice. Yes, it's about murder, the importance of family, self-sacrifice and what's more important in this life -- skill, intelligence and dedication, or beauty and sex appeal; but you might as well be reading about Bridget Jones counting cigarettes and worrying about Daniel Cleaver and Mark Darcy.

 

One other thing -- this is just a wonderfully designed book. The size -- smaller than your typical hardcover -- is distinctive, the typeface used in chapter headings and page numbers are peculiar enough to stand out. The whole thing just feels like a different kind of book. Does this make an impact on your enjoyment of the novel? Probably not, but I appreciated the experience and look.

 

I can't think of enough ways to praise Braithwaite -- there's an intangible quality to this book that just won me over pretty much on page one. You will not believe that this is her first novel -- and you will hope it's not her last. The sibling rivalry story was well-told and engaging, the hospital stories were enough to be the core of a very different novel by themselves, the serial killer story was unpredictable. The characters are the kind that you'll remember for a long time. Stop reading me and go find a copy of this book.

 

2018 Library Love Challenge

Source: http://irresponsiblereader.com/2018/11/27/my-sister-the-serial-killer-by-oyinkan-braithwaite-a-charming-dark-and-somehow-fun-serial-killer-tale