So Let It Be Written: The Biography of Metallica's James Hetfield  - Mark Eglinton

Here's the Publisher's synopsis:

The first and only biography of one of the best front men of the modern era.

 

With James Hetfield at the helm, Metallica went from being thrash pioneers to heavy metal gods. He overcame adolescent upheaval and personal demons—including his parents’ divorce, his mother’s untimely death and severe alcoholism—to become metal’s biggest star.

 

So Let It Be Written does justice to the many hats Hetfield has worn, with his strong leadership, signature vocal style, powerful guitar-playing and masterful songwriting. Author Mark Eglinton uses exclusive, firsthand interviews—with prominent rock stars and key figures in Hetfield’s life—to construct the definitive account of Hetfield.

 

There are many problems with this book. If it is a definitive account of Hetfield, it's because there's not a lot of competition. The firsthand interviews seem to be with people who knew Hetfield in school or shortly thereafter -- or friends of former bandmates. For insights from people closer to him, Eglinton seems to rely on interviews published in magazines or done on TV or in a documentary. I could be wrong about that -- there might be more original research performed by him, but given the utter lack of citation, it's hard to say for sure.

 

This book is primarily about Hetfield's professional life, following the account of Hetfield's mother's death, we maybe get two full paragraphs (scattered over chapters) about Hetfield's family (but repeated statements that family is the most important thing to Hetfield), and his friendships outside the band aren't given much more space.

 

Rather than a biography of James Hetfield, this comes across as the story of Metallica with a focus on the input, influence, and antics of Hetfield. With a special emphasis on glorying in the music and lyrics of the albums leading up to Metallica/The Black Album, and in denigrating everything from Load through the build-up for the release of Hardwired... to Self-Destruct, which wasn't released in time for him to come up with a strong opinion about (with some okay words directed to the documentaries and films produced in that time).

 

It's clear that Eglinton was a fan of early Metallica, and has a wide appreciation for and knowledge of the metal scene. He has the knowledge base and the passion to produce a strong book about the band -- but he seems to lack the ability to focus on the life of one man. Somehow, the author wrote a similar looking book, James Hetfield: The Wolf at Metallica's Door, seven years earlier than this -- and it was longer. I'm not sure how he pulled that off -- my guess is more analysis of the contents of albums and/or his estimation of their worth. I'm curious about the differences between the two, but not enough to put up with reading it to compare.

 

James Hetfield is a deeply flawed, incredibly talented, and interesting figure. A biography of him should be intrinsically and automatically fascinating, and it takes a certain kind of author to take that potential and turn it into a disappointment. Sadly, Eglinton is just that kind of author.

 

Don't bother.


2018 Library Love Challenge

Source: http://irresponsiblereader.com/2018/10/31/so-let-it-be-written-by-mark-eglinton-a-disappointingly-delivered-account-of-a-rock-stars-career