Luck Favors the Prepared - Nathaniel Barber

If the title is true, Nathaniel Barber was/would have been one of the worst Boy Scouts in the world. You don't have to read many of these non-fiction short stories to decide that luck and Barber are, at best, passing acquaintances. Which is probably good -- they make for better reading that way (Barber, might disagree about the "good" there -- it is his life).

 

These stories don't detail his life, they give you glimpses into experiences that have stuck with him for one reason or another, and largely they resonated with me. For example, his first (disastrous) experience with being a landlord. His goals for it were pretty much what I'd envisioned the time or three I thought about trying it. How it turned out for him, is pretty much what I feared would happen to me. A lot of what happened to him as a band geek made me think of what it was like when I was one (thankfully, it was a little tamer for me). I've never had a coworker like Dale Kendrick, but I can name one or two individuals that easily could've been.

 

Not all of his stories are those the reader will be able to identify with -- but there's something in his telling of them that will allow you to see yourself in that situation, and feel the humanity.

 

There is one important difference between his life experiences and mine -- or most readers' -- his are funny. Or at least the way he's able to present them is (probably more the latter than the former). Not always in a laugh-out-loud way, sometimes it'll just be a wry smile, or shake of the head. But Barber's been able to mine the humor in most of these situations -- frequently at his expense.

 

Each story has a different feel to it, so even though they're all about the same central character, they're individual stories. They don't all flow chronologically -- he jumps back and forth though his life, you won't walk away with a "life story" or anything, you'll just get a good understanding of various points in his life. It's like sitting around a table with an old friend, "Did I ever tell you about the time . . . "

 

Barber's writing chops are evident throughout this, whether he's going for economy of words:

 

Against the advice of my lawyer and stern warnings from my therapist, I accepted Elsbeth’s invitation to lunch.


or if he's going for a visual that will stick with you:

 

Mr. Millson was a short, puggish man. He was skinny except for a cantaloupe gut he not only ignored but allowed to lend heft to his wagging swagger. He was short and compensated for this with a simmering, constant temper, always fired up and red-faced. Even when he was just trying to schmooze an extra scoop of Jell-O from the lunch lady. His lips were not lips, but the absence of lips. Sweaty flaps, really. Fleshy bits of face he pursed to a thin, kissy embouchure under a bulbous, alcoholic nose.


you get exactly the idea he was going for -- this isn't some sort of arty-ambiguity here, it's a precise brushstroke. He wants you to feel what he felt, he wants you to see what he saw -- and he wants you to at least grin about it. Sometimes he's not that subtle; infrequently, he could be more skillful about it -- but he's hitting his targets, he's evoking memories about embarrassments of our youth, empathy over similar struggles of young adulthood, or a slight feeling of dread knowing that's exactly how you'd react in that situation. Thankfully, he generally wants that to be followed with a chuckle.

 

 

Creative, distinctive, amusing -- this collection will leave you wanting to see more from Nathaniel Barber, while being very glad you have this.

 

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion and participation in this book tour. I appreciated the book, but my opinions expressed are my own.

Source: http://irresponsiblereader.com/2017/09/07/luck-favors-the-prepared-by-nathaniel-barber