The Furthest Station - Ben Aaronovitch

He asked if we were really ghost hunting, and I said we were.

 

“What, like officially?”

 

“Officially secret,” I said because discretion is supposed to be, if not our middle name, at least a nickname we occasionally answer to when we remember.


This novella hit the spot -- a short, but fully developed, adventure with our friends from the Rivers of London series -- full of action, a bit of snark, and seeing Peter in his element (and far out of it, too). Would I have preferred a full novel? Sure -- but if I can't have one, this is more than adequate.

 

Peter Grant, apprentice wizard and Police Constable, is investigating several reports of a ghost terrorizing people on the Underground during the morning commute. Naturally, even when interviewed immediately following a sighting the witness would only be able to remember details for a few moments before they forgot and/or rationalized them away. Which makes it pretty difficult to ask follow-up questions. As Peter continues to investigate, he ends up finding a very non-supernatural crime that he needs to deal with, even if he goes about it in a pretty supernatural way. While there's little in this series that I don't like, but Peter doing regular policework is one of my favorite parts.

Along for the ride (and looking for trouble) is his cousin, Abigail Jumara, acting as a summer intern for the Folly. Honestly, I barely remembered her when she shows up here -- but I eventually remembered her, and I was glad to see her back. I'm not necessarily sure that I need to see her all the time, but seeing more of her would definitely be pleasant.

 

In addition to the subplot about Abigail's future, there's a subplot revolving around another personification of a river -- not one of Mama Thames', either. I enjoyed it, and thought it fit in nicely with the rest of the novella, while giving us the requisite dose of a body of water.

 

There's not a lot to sink your teeth into here -- but the novella length doesn't leave you wanting more (like a short story would). It's good to see the Folly involved in smaller cases. Not just the serial killing, major magical threat, etc. kind of thing -- but the "smaller" stuff, too.

 

For any fan of the Folly/Peter Grant/Rivers of London series, this is one to get. It'd even make a pretty good introduction to the series for someone who hasn't yet discovered this fun UF series.


Disclaimer: I received this eARC from Subterranean Press via NetGalley in exchange for this post -- thanks to both, I needed something like this.
N.B.: As this was an ARC, any quotations above may be changed in the published work -- I will endeavor to verify them as soon as possible.

Source: http://irresponsiblereader.com/2017/04/25/the-furthest-station-by-ben-aaronovitch