Hack: A perfect summer read... - Duncan MacMaster
Little victories, since they're all I can hope for, they're what I live for.

Jake Mooney used to be a pretty good reporter -- good reputation, good results -- but he got out of that game and got into a more lucrative field, even if it was more distasteful. Events transpired,  and that goes away -- I'll let you read it for yourself, but it involves lawyers and an ex-wife. Nowadays, he gets by being a ghost-writer for established authors who don't have the time or ability to write their own material. Out of the blue, he gets an offer to help a former TV star, Rick Rendell, write his autobiography. He'll even get credited for it. Credit -- and a nice cash bonus. How can he say no?

 

Before you can say "Jessica Fletcher," someone tries to kill Jake and then Rick is shot in front of a handful of witnesses, including Jake. Between his affection for (some of) the people in Rick's life, worry over his own safety, curiosity, and his own sense of justice, Jake dives in and investigates the murder himself.

 

Jake finds himself knee-deep in a morass involving unscrupulous agents (I'm not sure there's another kind in fiction), wives (current and ex-), Hollywood politics, an IRS investigation, a Drug Cartel, former co-stars, hedge fund managers, hit men, and a decades-old mysterious death. And a few more fresh deaths. . The notes he's already taken for the book gives Jake fodder for his investigation -- but the combination of notes and his continuing work provides the killer a constant target (and threat). As long as Jake's working on the mystery/mysteries -- and doing better than the police at uncovering crimes and suspects -- the killer can't just escape, Jake has to be stopped.

 

The voice was great, the mystery had plenty of twists and turns, Jake's ineptitude with firearms was a great touch and served to keep him from being a super-hero. I really can't think of anything that didn't work. There's not a character in the book that you don't enjoy reading about. I had three strong theories about what led to Rick's death and who was responsible -- the one I feared the most wasn't it (thankfully -- it was a little too trite). My favorite theory was ultimately right about the who, but was absolutely wrong about everything else. I take that as a win -- I felt good about my guess and better about the very clever plotting and writing that outsmarted me.

 

That's more about me than I intended it to be, so let me try this again -- MacMaster has set up a great classic mystery -- a la Rex Stout or Agatha Christie. A dogged investigator with a personal stake in the case, supporting characters that you can't help but like (or dislike, as appropriate), a number of suspects with reasons to kill the victim (with a decent amount of overlap between those two groups), and a satisfying conclusion that few readers will see coming. Hack is funny, but not in a overly-comedic way, it's just because Jake and some of the others he's with have good senses of humor. I chuckled a few times, grinned a few more.

 

I bought MacMaster's previous book, A Mint Condition Corpse, when it came out last year -- sadly, it's languishing in a dark corner of my Kindle with a handful of other books from Fahrenheit Press (I'm a great customer, lousy reader, of that Press).  Hack wasn't just an entertaining read, it was a great motivator to move his other book higher on my TBR list. Get your hands on this one folks, you'll have a great time.

 

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this from the publisher, nevertheless, the opinions expressed are my own.

Source: http://irresponsiblereader.com/2017/03/17/hack-by-duncan-macmaster-2